パリ首脳外交 対テロ連帯アピールする場に

The Yomiuri Shimbun
Gathering of global leaders sets stage for antiterrorism solidarity
パリ首脳外交 対テロ連帯アピールする場に

The leaders of about 150 nations and territories have gathered in Paris, about two weeks after coordinated terrorist attacks in the city. This demonstrates a growing antiterrorism mood in the international community.

What is important is to have this momentum lead to reinforced cooperation among countries concerned to defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) extremist militant group.

In his address at the 21st Session of the Conference of the Parties to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP21), French President Francois Hollande, whose country is the conference chair, said that the fights against terrorism and global warming are “two big global challenges we have to face up to.”

German Chancellor Angela Merkel emphasized that participating countries strongly condemn terrorism no matter where it happens.

The sight of world leaders offering silent prayers for the victims of the terrorist attacks in Paris must have made a strong impression on people around the world.

In talks with Hollande, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said, “Such terrorist acts challenge values we hold in common,” confirming that both countries would cooperate in antiterrorism measures.

U.S. President Barack Obama held talks with his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, and agreed on the importance of a ceasefire in the Syrian civil war and of the implementation of a political road map aimed at realizing a transition to a new regime.

There still remains a gap between the United States, looking for an end to the administration led by Syrian President Bashar Assad, and Russia, which supports Assad. But it deserves recognition that both leaders kept in place a cooperative trend in fighting against ISIL.

U.S., Russia still at odds

Obama asserted that Russia should focus on fighting ISIL, while Putin brought forward the need for dividing the multiple rebel groups in Syria into extremist groups to be targets of airstrikes and moderate opposition groups as parties to negotiate with.

In realizing peace talks between the Assad regime and the opposition groups, it is quite significant to make efforts to distinguish these rebel groups.

Offering his condolences regarding the Russian pilot who died after his military aircraft was shot down by Turkish warplanes, Obama told Putin that the United States will ease its sanctions against Russia once the ceasefire agreement to resolve the conflict in eastern Ukraine is fully implemented. This can be translated as the United States giving consideration to France, now aiming to form an international coalition to fight ISIL.

What is worrisome is that deteriorated relations between Russia and Turkey following the downing of the Russian warplane have cast a shadow over the solidarity of the international community.

Russia has imposed a package of economic sanctions against Turkey, restricting trade and tourism with the country, while Moscow is demanding Ankara apologize as one of the conditions for Putin to hold a dialogue with his Turkish counterpart.

Putin accused Turkey of being involved in ISIL-led oil smuggling. Ankara denied Putin’s claim, saying that it is the Assad regime that is buying oil from the militants.

The U.N. Security Council has adopted a resolution calling for reinforced efforts to stop the sources of funding for ISIL. It will also become necessary to make efforts to conduct thorough controls on borders with Syria so as to contain the flow of people and goods to ISIL.

(From The Yomiuri Shimbun, Dec. 2, 2015)

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